Tag Archives: falcons ottawa

Merlins High & Low

I’ve had a fascination with falcons since childhood, when I first learned about the art of falconry, and have always thought it would be the most glorious thing ever to have my very own falcon to take flight from, and return to, my gloved hand.

Sadly, though understandably, there are laws that prevent me from keeping a falcon, however, for a few months now, I have had my own falcons, sort of, as a pair of merlins came to nest this spring atop the 60-foot spruce tree at the back of our yard!

Merlins are small falcons, beautiful birds, whose urban population is on the increase, especially here in the Ottawa area. We’ve spent the last few months watching and listening to the rather noisy comings and goings of our resident raptors and were fairly certain in recent days, though hard to know, that there were babies in the nest.

Our suspicions were confirmed yesterday morning when I discovered a juvenile merlin perched just inches off the ground, on a rock under our apple tree. I started to approach, gingerly, so as not to alarm him (it just seemed like a ‘him’) but decided to wait and watch for a bit and went back inside, where I could watch from the kitchen window. When he continued to do nothing, even with his family calling overhead, I went back out armed with a towel and a laundry basket.

It took little to toss the towel over him and scoop him into the basket. I put the basket on the deck in hope that a parent would see him and somehow help him back up where he belonged but it became clear that was not going to happen and so the decision was made to take him out to the Wild Bird Care Centre, where they do marvelous work rehabilitating injured birds and returning them to the wild whenever possible.

Back out in the yard, we had been watching to make sure our poor little guy did not fall prey to a cat or a crow. The neighbourhood is full of crows and we had seen them harass the merlins on several occasions. There they were again, and it was soon clear why – another juvenile, unquestionable a sibling to the poor thing in the basket, was flitting amongst the mid-branches of the spruce tree and two crows were acting as a tag-team against the merlins. Action was needed!

Enter the slingshot, hastily retrieved from the basement. My son managed some well-placed shots that drove off one crow but the other swooped in on Young Merlin in the tree. He took off in an erratic flight – fear, ineptitude or perhaps both – and the crow took a strike. Downy feathers rained from the sky but Young Merlin flew on and disappeared into the maple trees across the street. Mother Merlin gave frantic calls but Young Merlin remained out of sight. But Poor Baby, in the basket, needed attention and eventually we had to hope for the best for Young Merlin and move on.

Poor Baby was silent and still on the drive to the care centre. Once there, they conducted a preliminary examination and said he didn’t look good, but gave us a reference number we could use to call and receive status reports on our bird. We were happy to hear that if he recovered enough to qualify for release, we would be able to pick him up and bring him home for release in our yard! We made a contribution to their donation box and left him in their expert care.

We watched throughout the afternoon and evening as Mother Merlin spent most of her time sitting like a sentinel on the same top-most branch of the tree, calling now and then but receiving only silence in return. It was a sad sight.

And then, this morning, I saw Young Merlin back on the lower branches of his home tree! He called as he fluttered between branches, while Mother Merlin sat in her usual spot high aloft, no longer such a sorry sight.

I came back in and phoned the Wild Bird Care Centre for a status report. Sadly, Poor Baby didn’t make it beyond early this morning.

The slingshot sits ready at the back door and we will be watching, ready to help if we can, as Young Merlin loses his last bits of baby fluff and gets good enough at flying to better fend for himself.

And I will continue to imagine, though a dream is all it will ever be, how cool it would be to raise my arm to the sky and have a falcon swoop in for a landing …

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If you live in or near Ottawa, visit the Wild Bird Care Centre (on Moodie Drive, in Nepean) to see the birds they are continually helping. Please be sure to put what you can in the donation box on your way out – the work these volunteers do is amazing and the need for supplies is never-ending.

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